Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Wasted a lot of time, human resources and money at a different location

MH370 wing found on Reunion Island means searchers may have been looking in the WRONG part of the Indian Ocean for more than one year

  • Independent experts have identified a new crash zone for flight MH370 
  • Drift analysis predicts wreckage could be found in Southern Indian Ocean
  • Dr Henrik Rydberg believes debris located is from missing Malaysia flight
  • His findings were released before ATSB released matching details


A drift analysis on a plane wing found on Reunion Island has identified a new crash zone for flight MH370 and predicts the wreckage will be found at the opposite end of where the search is being carried out.
The new analysis was released by Sweden-based physicist Dr Henrik Rydberg, who has been independently investigating MH370 with a team, on Monday, News Corp reports.
The area where the wreckage of the Malaysia Airlines flight could be found is in the Southern Indian Ocean, which is at the northern part of the search area being carried out by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB), according to Dr Rydberg.
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A drift analysis on a plane wing found on Reunion Island predicts the wreckage of missing flight MH370 will be found at the opposite end of where the search is currently being carried out
A drift analysis on a plane wing found on Reunion Island predicts the wreckage of missing flight MH370 will be found at the opposite end of where the search is currently being carried out
Dr Rydberg believes debris found on Reunion Island last Wednesday is likely to be from the missing Boeing 777 as his findings reveal the wing could have washed up on the island three months ago.
'In spite of search efforts in other areas around the South Indian Ocean (SIO), nothing has yet been found,' Dr Rydberg said in his report, MH370: Finding the Debris Origin.
'Taken together, it is not unlikely that La Reunion and nearby Mauritius are in fact the initial recipients of debris from MH370. The notion of initial recipient is important. With that assumption, it turns out that we can work out approximately where the debris originated.
'The most likely origin of the flaperon is currently a 120 square nautical miles area, centred at (34S, 94E).' 
A report released by Australian Transport Safety Bureau on Wednesday stated the most recent drift modelling indicated most of the debris is likely to have been north and west away from the accident site
A report released by Australian Transport Safety Bureau on Wednesday stated the most recent drift modelling indicated most of the debris is likely to have been north and west away from the accident site

The new analysis was released by Sweden-based physicist Dr Henrik Rydberg after a plane wing was found washed up on Reunion Island last Wednesday

The new analysis was released by Sweden-based physicist Dr Henrik Rydberg after a plane wing was found washed up on Reunion Island last Wednesday
Dr Rydberg believes debris found on Reunion Island (pictured) is likely to be from the missing Boeing 777 as his findings reveal the wing could have washed up on the island three months ago
Dr Rydberg believes debris found on Reunion Island (pictured) is likely to be from the missing Boeing 777 as his findings reveal the wing could have washed up on the island three months ago
His findings match a report released by ATSB on Wednesday on the revised search zone.
'The most recent drift modelling indicated that the net drift of most debris in the 16 months to July 2015 is likely to have been north and then west away from the accident site,' the ATSB report states.
'The drift analysis undertaken by the CSIRO further supports that the debris from MH370 may be found as far west of the search area as La Reunion Island

'This is consistent with the currently defined search area.'
It comes after the Federal Government announced an Australian expert will examine the piece of wing found on Reunion island to help determine whether it comes from the vanished Malaysia Airlines flight.
The most recent drift modelling indicated that the net drift of most debris in the 16 months to July 2015 is likely to have been north and then west away from the accident site, according to the ATSB
The most recent drift modelling indicated that the net drift of most debris in the 16 months to July 2015 is likely to have been north and then west away from the accident site, according to the ATSB
An Australian expert will examine the piece of wing found on Reunion island to help determine whether it comes from the vanished Malaysia Airlines flight MH370
An Australian expert will examine the piece of wing found on Reunion island to help determine whether it comes from the vanished Malaysia Airlines flight MH370

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